West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

View previous topic View next topic Go down

West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Sun 13 Mar 2011 - 3:07

If the Germans had taken Iceland just before the British did, could JU-52s be used between east Iceland & West Norway? Took 3 weeks to build an extra runway at Trondheim, same could be done in Iceland.




Distance from Egilsstadir, Iceland to Flesland, Bergen, Norway is 704.7 miles, 1134.1 km, or 612 nm
http://www.distancefrom.info/Egilsstadir/Iceland/

JU 52.
The normal range is 530 miles with a 5,000 pound load, or 790 miles with maximum fuel and a 4,000 pound load.

http://www.fjr2.be/Pagina%2025%20-%20Airplanes%20of%20the%20fallschirmj%E4ger.htm


Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Sun 13 Mar 2011 - 3:09

Here is the airstrip in Egilsstadir today.


http://www.photo.is/fly/pages/kps0704%20881.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egilssta%C3%B0ir


Herlda airbase a bit closer than Bergen. Exact distance to Egilsstadir not known.

http://www.museumvest.no/index.php?action=static&id=35









Vaernes.

The Germans forces started improving the airport, helped by thousands of Norwegian workers, within weeks having built a new runway. This new runway was used by the Germans to more effectively bomb the Norwegian and Allied forces on the Narvik front.
http://www.airports-worldwide.com/norway/trondheim_vaernes_norway.php


& British radar was poor in 1940. Shetlands had very few aircraft & it was easy to fly below radar anyways.

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Mon 21 Mar 2011 - 7:27

Panzer IIs were unloaded at Norway which weighed considerably more than Stukas did, therefore, no reason Stukas could not be unloaded via ship at Iceland.

Panzer II
Weight 7.2 tonnes
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panzer_II



Stuka
empty weight 8,600 pounds,( little over 4 tons).
http://www.vectorsite.net/avstuka.html







On April 9th, first and second companies were sent to Denmark, while third company was sent to Norway aboard ships "Urundi" and "Antaris H". On April 17th, only single Panzerkampfwagen I and Panzerkampfwagen II arrived in Oslo aboard "Urundi".


three Neubaufahrzeug Panzerkampfwagen VI (Krupp turret) heavy tanks commanded by Lieutenant Hans Horstmann was sent to Norway. This unit was also known as Panzerzug Horstmann or Zug Putloss. It arrived in Oslo on April 19th,
http://www.nuav.net/panzer.html

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Tue 13 Sep 2011 - 3:56

Took 3 weeks to build an extra runway at Trondheim, same could be done in Iceland.

Once again I would recommend you check out the history of RAF Kaldadarnes to find out exactly what it took to establish and airfield and runway on Iceland in a suitable location. I believe an old friend of yours has done some considerable resarch on this....

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Tue 13 Sep 2011 - 10:26

Yah, he did a really lame job too. See other thread, really funny stuff. He said Kaldadarnes washed out due to rain in 41, when it was 43. That's 2-3 years of use prior to that washout.


6 Mar 1943
A
River Ölfusį surrounding Kaldašarnes airfield overflowed and inundated airfield and lower camp site. Six P-38 Aircobra aircraft of 33rd Squadron Detachment returned to base. Water two feet deep. No 269 Squadron relocated at RAF Reykjavik.

http://www.oca.269squadron.btinternet.co.uk/history/squadron_history/chronology/1943.htm

Couldn't get a fact straight to save his life that one.

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Tue 13 Sep 2011 - 13:53

Yah, he did a really lame job too. See other thread, really funny stuff. He said Kaldadarnes washed out due to rain in 41, when it was 43. That's 2-3 years of use prior to that washout

Razz If you check again, and his source material, you'll find out that Kaldadarnes' runways had the ballast washed out from underneath them AT LEAST twice, that the River Olfusa flooded the runways "frequently"... it's the WHOLE CAMP that was only flooded once!

Not only does your old friend get his facts VERY straight - he doesn't do what you do...come onto yet another forum and repeat your original, uncorrected claims, after you've had it PROVED to you elsewhere in detail that you're talking rubbish.

Sooner or later you'll run out of forums that way...how many is it your ideas have been ridiculed on now and you've run away from, or you've been banned from?


As for THIS...

Panzer IIs were unloaded at Norway which weighed considerably more than Stukas did, therefore, no reason Stukas could not be unloaded via ship at Iceland

You DO realise, don't you, that aircraft get transported by cargo ship dismantled??? Tanks don't...

Where's the heavy lift capacity ON Iceland to cart a disassembled Stuka to where it can be reassembled???

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Tue 13 Sep 2011 - 22:53

Craneships for one of which Germany was in possession of several. There are also booms & lighters, the basic ship to shore accoutrements all developed nations possessed at the time.

As an asides, any paved road around Reykjavic would serve as a runway for Stukas. & yes there were paved roads in & around Reykjavic circa 1940 I'm sure you would be shocked to learn.

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Tue 13 Sep 2011 - 23:03

Craneships for one of which Germany was in possession of several.

Requiring quays to desposit their loads upon.

And that doesn't solve the problem of where and how the assembly kits went THEN to be put together again!

There are also booms & lighters, the basic ship to shore accoutrements all developed nations possessed at the time.

And you expect THESE slow-moving items to make it across an RN-dominated North Sea?

As an asides, any paved road around Reykjavic would serve as a runway for Stukas.

Er, no - any STRAIGHT SECTIONS of paved road would serve as a runway for Stukas... Twisted Evil

& yes there were paved roads in & around Reykjavic circa 1940 I'm sure you would be shocked to learn..

Why would I be shocked?

It was ME had to show YOU the roadmap of Iceland's paved roads circa 1940 elsewhere! Laughing Laughing Laughing YOU claimed there were roads all voer the shop they could use, I had to show you how limited the paved road network really was Rolling Eyes

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Tue 13 Sep 2011 - 23:09

Oh, nearly forgot...

As an asides, any paved road around Reykjavic would serve as a runway for Stukas.
Er, no - any STRAIGHT SECTIONS of paved road would serve as a runway for Stukas...

They need to be stretches of straight tarmac hundreds of metres long, with flat, hardpacked land to either side for parking/refuelling/re-arming aircraft, taxiing etc.....and preferably no drainage ditches on either side of the road, or crash barriers, or walls, or fences...

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 0:10

Er, yah, you figger the straight part out yourself? or did someone assist you with it?

No I showed you Hwy 1. you thought they were gonna fight in the center of the Island on the Iceberg, remember?


Booms aren't slow moving, they are on/part of the ship.


Plenty Quays all over Iceland with it 57 ocean going ports.

There are 57 ports in Iceland for ocean-going vessels,
http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/2006/09/07/1871982.htm

Had Quays there for hundreds of years, it's a fishing nation.

Fishing Boats by the Quay in the Harbour at Husavik, North Iceland,
http://bestpriceprobe.com/products/fishing-boats-by-the-quay-in-the-harbour-at-husavik-north-iceland-polar-regions.html


Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 0:24

What a crock.

Plenty Quays all over Iceland with it 57 ocean going ports.

There are 57 ports in Iceland for ocean-going vessels,

That article was written in 2006, SIXTY-SIX YEARS after your suggested invasion date. Things have changed...

Had Quays there for hundreds of years, it's a fishing nation

There's a slight difference between the quay needed for tie a fishboat up against, and the port quayside needed to unload heavy cargo Rolling Eyes

Fishing Boats by the Quay in the Harbour at Husavik, North Iceland

Laughing Laughing Laughing Are you honestly trying to claim that's a 1940 picture? Rolling Eyes

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 1:03

What a crock, are you really insisting Quays were not used for centuies for Iceland's fishing industry? Are you really insisting ocean going vessels never went to or operated in Iceland pre 1940? Ridiculous.


The export of fish and fish products has greatly increased. In 1849 to 1855 the annual average exported was 1480 tons; whereas at the close of the century (in 1899) it amounted to 11,339 tons and 68,079 barrels of oil, valued at L276,596
http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Iceland


Last edited by Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 1:12; edited 1 time in total

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 1:09

What a crock, are you really insisting Quays were not used for centuies for Iceland's fishing industry?

There is a very great difference between the size and width of quay used by oceangoing ships and liners, compared to fishing boats. When the time comes that I can post links and images, I'll have to wipe the floor with you AGAIN appropriately.

Are you really insisting ocean going vessels never went to Iceland pre 1940? Ridiculous..

No, I'm quite sure oceangoing cargo ships and liners went to Iceland - but I'm equally sure they unloaded at docks that could accomodate them. Not small narrow piers in remote fishing villages....

In the meantime, you could prove your point by finding ANY mention or photographic proof of vessels the size of the Bremen or Europa docking and disembarking cargo anywhere in iceland other than at a dock large enough to accomodate them...

The export of fish and fish products has greatly increased. In 1849 to 1855 the annual average exported was 1480 tons; whereas at the close of the century (in 1899) it amounted to 11,339 tons and 68,079 barrels of oil, valued at L276,596

As usual, you revert to irrelevancies. THAT reference says NOTHING about the size of vessels carrying it, nor the ports they were exporting it from Rolling Eyes


Last edited by SecondFront on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 1:13; edited 1 time in total

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 1:12

The export of fish and fish products has greatly increased. In 1849 to 1855 the annual average exported was 1480 tons; whereas at the close of the century (in 1899) it amounted to 11,339 tons and 68,079 barrels of oil, valued at L276,596
http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Iceland.

Bremen & Europa were earmarked for exactly that, Op Ikarus, do you suppose the German naval planners would've deliberately sent these ships ad hoc without knowing the port specs of Iceland? Absurdiloa.

How do you reckon the British unloaded at Iceland?



The cargo ships and the 5th defense Battalion had to unload at the quays
http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USMC/USMC-C-Iceland/


Last edited by Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 1:25; edited 1 time in total

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 1:15

Bremen & Europa were earmarked for exactly that, Op Ikarus, do you suppose the German naval planners would've deliberately sent these ships ad hoc without knowing the port specs of Iceland? Absurdiloa.

And WHAT PORT were they earmarked to disembark their cargo AT?

How do you reckon the British unloaded at Iceland?

Tell you what - I'll even use YOUR source! From Wiki -

The invasion began in the early morning of 10 May 1940 with British troops disembarking in Reykjavķk, capital of neutral Iceland.

The British planned to land all of their forces at Reykjavķk. There, they would overcome any resistance and take care of local Germans. To guard against a German counterattack by sea, they would secure the harbour and send troops by land to nearby Hvalfjöršur. The British were also worried that the Germans might airlift troops, as they had done with great success in their Norwegian Campaign. To guard against this, troops would drive east to the landing grounds at Sandskeiš and Kaldašarnes....

...a paragraph that ends with the following sentence -

Lastly, troops would be sent by land to the harbour at Akureyri and the landing ground at Melgerši in the north of the country

In other words - the harbour there was too small/unsuitable to land at! And the harbours anywhere else in Southland were too small or unsuitable or they wouldn't have had to go to them by road, they could have landed directly at them.


SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 1:27

Actually no, Akuryi is a large port/harbor. & it is in the north part of Iceland, not the south.


The cargo ships and the 5th defense Battalion had to unload at the quays
http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USMC/USMC-C-Iceland/.



The port of Akureyri is vital to the town, which largely bases its livelihood on fisheries. It is the site of large fish processing plants and has docking facilities for trawlers.[51] It is also important for freight handling and for tourism, as cruise ships stop in Akureyri during the summer months.[52] The ice-free nature of the port has been important in the town's establishment.[53]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akureyri

http://www.photoship.co.uk/JAlbum%20Ships/Ports%20Harbours%20Piers/slides/Akureyri%20Harbour-01.html




1862. From that point, Akureyri started to grow because of the excellent port conditions and perhaps more because of the productive agricultural region around it. Industries processing agricultural products became the backbone of the city and spurred its further growth
http://www.knowledgerush.com/kr/encyclopedia/Akureyri/

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 1:39

men were sent by ship to land at Akureyri and Melgerši, respectively, in the Eyjafjöršur (a fjord) on the northern coast to guard against potential German landings.

http://ww2db.com/battle_spec.php?battle_id=218


Destroyer Somali...
but they managed to rig up a new line and both ships continued to crawl to Akureyri, Iceland
http://www.uboat.net/allies/merchants/ships/2189.html

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 1:54

Actually no, Akuryi is a large port/harbor.

So why did the British not simply sail there and disembark? Wink

& it is in the north part of Iceland, not the south

I do know - I was making the point the the unsuitability of 1940 small Icelandic harbours for disembarkation applied equally to the north AND south coasts... Twisted Evil

The port of Akureyri is vital to the town, which largely bases its livelihood on fisheries. It is the site of large fish processing plants and has docking facilities for trawlers.[51] It is also important for freight handling and for tourism, as cruise ships stop in Akureyri during the summer months.[52] The ice-free nature of the port has been important in the town's establishment.[53]

Why are you wasting time and energy posting up a NON-CONTEMPORARY reference dating from somewhere in the last few years? If what relevance is the size of Akureyri TODAY, SEVENTY-ONE years of development later, to the size of the town and its facilities in 1940? Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes

Hmmm, nice resource on the conditions in Iceland!

Only one ship at a time could enter or leave the only entrance to Reykjavik harbor in June 1941

Early in the morning of 7 July, the brigade's convoy approached Iceland and the capital city of Reykjavik. The sea was glassy calm, the sun was well up and bright as it did not set in July in northern lands. The strong odor of fish floated out over the troop ships from the port. A couple of the transports were able to tie up at the small stone quays and Marines lined the rails to examine the people and sights of their new station.

One detail the British neglected to discuss with the Marines was the matter of tides in northern latitudes and neither the U.S. Navy nor the Marine planners seemed to be aware of the 14-foot tide which almost washed the landing force back from its small stony landing beach into the cold Arctic seas.

Marines unloaded the ships by manhandling bulk cargo equipment, and ammunition from holds into cargo nets which were lowered into the landing craft alongside by the ships' large booms. The boats then ran the short distance to shore where Marine working parties again unloaded the cargo by hand and carried it up onto the beach. Because the Marines had few trucks, they were almost completely dependent upon Royal Army Service Corps two-ton lorries (trucks) to move supplies and equipment to destinations inland. It all went slowly and with hours the tide began to overtake the unloading. The sea came in and inundated the beaches and Marine supplies. Soon cardboard containers of rations, wool shirts, equipment, and supplies were awash or drifting out into the stream.

Yeah, that's going to be REALLY practical for unloading complete Stukas by crane from ships!

Oh, and a nice pic of Akureyri - pity we don't know when it dates from...

Destroyer Somali...
but they managed to rig up a new line and both ships continued to crawl to Akureyri, Iceland

Yes - IN 1942 - when the British were using it then as a destroyer base!

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 2:14

Indeed, would have worked as a destroyer base in 1940 also! Oh me god what do you know.

Quays worked for P-38's unloaded at Reykjavic, no reason wingless or complete Stukas should have any difficulty either.


Forget the modern data, read this old data I posted.

1862. From that point, Akureyri started to grow because of the excellent port conditions and perhaps more because of the productive agricultural region around it. Industries processing agricultural products became the backbone of the city and spurred its further growth
http://www.knowledgerush.com/kr/encyclopedia/Akureyri/.

Now, if agriculture was big in 1862, do you suppose they made a chain of rowboats to get those potatoes to Europe or to the other ports of Iceland? Or did they have Quays & normal port facilities?


Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 2:25

Quays worked for P-38's unloaded at Reykjavic, no reason wingless or complete Stukas should have any difficulty either..

What is the source for this...and were they unloaded complete OR wingless?


Indeed, would have worked as a destroyer base in 1940 also! Oh me god what do you know

I know the British didn't find it practical to sail there in ANY sort of vessel, large or small, in the initial invasion of Iceland...


1862. From that point, Akureyri started to grow because of the excellent port conditions and perhaps more because of the productive agricultural region around it. Industries processing agricultural products became the backbone of the city and spurred its further growth

Now, if agriculture was big in 1862, do you suppose they made a chain of rowboats to Europe or to the other ports of Iceland? Or did they have Quays & normal port facilities?

Yes - 1862. And what size of cargo ships do you suppose loaded agricultural produce at Akureyri IN 1862??? In an era when we're probably talking about produce IN SACKS or BARRELS loaded by manual labour?

And what's the guarantee that by "excellent port conditions" they don't mean THE WEATHER? Or an ICE-FREE port? Or a harbour easy to navigate in and out of in all tide states? or the depth of the harbour basin? Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes

As a reference that's so non-specific it's useless.

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 2:37

It does say ice free, not useless. read man read. & the fact that Destroyers could & did operate there negates your assertion that it was not a useful post as regards war interests. Destroyers often did debark invasion troops in other countries during the war.

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 2:58

O I HAVE read your reference....and it doesn't say ice-free. What it DOES say however is THIS -

The body of sea between Oddeyri and the fjord’s bottom is known as Pollurinn and is known for calm winds and a good natural harbor.

The surrounding mountains also shield the city from blowing winds.

...and in the north of Iceland THAT is certainly enough to qualify it as having "excellent harbour conditions".

Because.....your source indicates that you might actually be WRONG about it being ice-free!

The city’s position in the bottom of a long fjord surrounded by high mountains has the influence that the climate is actually more inland than coastal meaning greater variants in temperature (warmer summers, colder winters) than in many other parts of Iceland.

And what does Iceland have "inland"??? Especially in Winter???

Wink

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 3:04

I don't suppose there's any point in telling you that SINCE your invasion idea was last discussed - I've by accident done a lot of reading on WEATHER CONDITIONS IN 1940 in Northern latitudes???

The winter of 1939-40 was the start of a three-year La Nina Event - in other words, the Jet Stream moved south, allowing the so-called "Polar Spiral" to shift FAR more cold weather down from the Arctic and for much longer than usual.

That's why conditions in April and May 1940 in Norway were much worse than usual...because the Spring Thaw was eight weeks late in arriving! Similarly, in the Spring of 1941 - still in the La Nina Event - the date of Operation Barbarossa had to be put back because Eastern European rivers were still in flood after the late thaw THAT year.

It is entirely possible that the reason the British couldn't just sail into Akureyri in early May 1940 is because it WAS still iced up! Shocked

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 3:35

Shipping coal & sulphur. well before 1940.

The sulphur was exported for gunpowder manufacture (competing with Sicily), and Iceland's sulphur was sufficiently important strategically for the USA to contemplate purchasing the entire country in 1867! None is worked now. Poor coal, or lignote, was mined from thin seams between lava flows in the NW fiords, and in the Tjörnes peninsula (Nort of Husavik), mainly during the First World War when imported coal was scarce. Iceland spar (calcite) for optical instruments was 'mined' ay Helgustadir in Reydarfljördur, eastern Iceland,

http://jorbons.home.xs4all.nl/souterrains/art/icelungr.html


The ice-free nature of the port has been important in the town's establishment
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akureyri

& the British DID sail into the port as was in 1940 as was previously explained to you.



men were sent by ship to land at Akureyri and Melgerši, respectively, in the Eyjafjöršur (a fjord) on the northern coast to guard against potential German landings.
http://ww2db.com/battle_spec.php?battle_id=218

Same old pattern, posit an assertion not based on facts, get it slotted, repeat. Not much has changed.

Perhaps you should focus on writing the long awaited book on the great Glacier battle of inner Eastland instead.


Last edited by Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 3:56; edited 1 time in total

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 3:53

& the British DID sail into the port as was in 1940 as was previously explained to you

Ahem, I suppose there's no real point in telling you that the British did as much IMPROVEMENT and DEVELOPMENT to the harbour at Akureyri as they did at Hvalfjordur after they got there - the whaling company that later used the facilities at Hvalfjordur used the piers built during the war I.E. THEY WERE NOT THERE WHEN THE BRITISH ARRIVED.

Shipping coal & sulphur. well before 1940.

The sulphur was exported for gunpowder manufacture (competing with Sicily), and Iceland's sulphur was sufficiently important strategically for the USA to contemplate purchasing the entire country in 1867! None is worked now. Poor coal, or lignote, was mined from thin seams between lava flows in the NW fiords, and in the Tjörnes peninsula (Nort of Husavik), mainly during the First World War when imported coal was scarce. Iceland spar (calcite) for optical instruments was 'mined' ay Helgustadir in Reydarfljördur, eastern Iceland,

What's the point in posting up that??? You've already been told elsewhere that the calcite was dug up in fist sized lumps and brought to the coast BY HORSE then taken off the island by small fishingboats? Did you forget that??? Rolling Eyes As for the sulphur - how do you think IT was packaged in the first half of the 19th century? In shipping containers? In plastic bags??? Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes

& the British DID sail into the port as was in 1940 as was previously explained to you.

men were sent by ship to land at Akureyri and Melgerši, respectively, in the Eyjafjöršur (a fjord) on the northern coast to guard against potential German landings.

Well, given that for some odd reason you seem to respect Wiki...

The British were also worried that the Germans might airlift troops, as they had done with great success in their Norwegian Campaign. To guard against this, troops would drive east to the landing grounds at Sandskeiš and Kaldašarnes. Lastly, troops would be sent by land to the harbour at Akureyri and the landing ground at Melgerši in the north of the country

Same old pattern, posit an assertion not based on facts, get it slotted, repeat. Not much has changed..

Yes, why are you still doing that???

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 3:57

I wouldn't want to cramp your style, I'll leave that to you. Good luck with the Eastland Glacier battle book.


What's the point in posting up that??? You've already been told elsewhere that the calcite was dug up in fist sized lumps and brought to the coast BY HORSE then taken off the island by small fishingboats?

And the link/source for this is?? Small fishing boats took Sulphur to Sweden? really now. Cute stuff.


In 1850, the first efforts to commercially exploit the calcite of Helgustadir were launched
More than three hundred tons of Iceland spar of the “ordinary” type were shipped to England alone
http://www.mindat.org/article.php/190/Helgustadir+Iceland+Spar+Mine


Last edited by Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 4:08; edited 1 time in total

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  SecondFront on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 4:03

What's the point in posting up that??? You've already been told elsewhere that the calcite was dug up in fist sized lumps and brought to the coast BY HORSE then taken off the island by small fishingboats?

And the link/source for this is??.

When I'm allowed to post links up on this forum after 7 days, you'll be the very first to know Wink But the hint is in the words in bold...

Small fishing boats took Sulphur to Sweden? really now. Cute stuff

Reduced again to straw men??? Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes I said the CALCITE was taken off the island by small fishing boats, not the sulphur.

SecondFront

Posts : 130
Join date : 2011-09-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Black Hornet on Wed 14 Sep 2011 - 7:14

& you were wrong about that too. 300 tons to England alone.

Black Hornet

Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-11-28

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: West Norway to East Iceland. 602 miles

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum